The God Complex

10-10-c

There is a scene in the recent movie Prometheus, where a human being asks why their creator created them and they seem to go on a unnecessary and unneeded journey to answer those burning questions.  Although this scene may appear innocuous and superfluous at first, it really resonates with me relating to a deep-seated desire that is embedded in the human psyche.  I believe we all have a God-Complex.  We adore our maker, want to please them, and desire to know our purpose.  We are always asking why we are here and exactly why we are the special one.  However, the God-Complex becomes something far more convoluted when we see our parents as our creators.

When we see our parents as our creators, we imbue them with god-like qualities that they may or may not deserve.  We spend our whole lives, in essence, worshiping and trying to appease them.  For some of us, we scorn our parents with a passion and try to disappoint them.  Those are two sides of the same coin, for we are acting in a way that we can get a reaction from them.  We crave their love and acceptance, and when we don’t get it, we feel empty and lost.  If we don’t get their unconditional love, we seek it out from our partners, who can only love us conditionally as any healthy, romantic relationship can.  We make our parents into these omnipotent beings who have so much power over us, when in fact, they are but mere mortals with faults such as our own.

There is a danger in seeing our parents as gods, for we seek acceptance from them that they may not be able to provide.  There is no way to reverse this God-Complex as it is ingrained in our DNA, but we may be better able to overcome our childhood traumas by recognizing this idea instead of placing our parents on a pedestal.  Some of our parents do deserve to be on a pedestal, some deserve no contact with us, but most of them are guilty of at least one foible and we must learn to not hold them to the same standards of gods.  When we do that, we will always be disappointed by them.  Although we can’t change our God-Complex, we can come to understand it and how it affects us growing up.

Perhaps then, we do not need to make unnecessary and unneeded journeys to ask what our purpose is and why we were created.  You may be planned, an accident, or an act of rape, but the circumstances of your conception and birth do not explain who you are.  Whether you were loved or unwanted affects you greatly, but it does not explain who you are either.  Who you are is dependent on how you view and understand yourself.  Once you see that your self-identity is not contingent on your birth, you may free yourself from the chains that hold you back.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s